lady holding pantry items to stock a from scratch pantry
Homemaking,  In the Home,  In the Kitchen

Stocking a Pantry to Cook From Scratch

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Today I am sharing some ideas for Stocking a Pantry to Cook From Scratch.

Stocking a pantry is a vital part of being a homemaker. I know it can be overwhelming to keep up with as well. Especially if you are trying to cook the meals in a from scratch manner. Whether you eat whole foods or just simply trying to cook more at home, these staples help me keep meals on the table. They are my go to items when shopping and ones that I always keep a steady supply of.

Dry Goods

Flour- Ideally an all purpose organic and unbleached one. This type of flour is useful for any flour needs you may have. From baking breads, to thickening soups and all your baked goods.

Rice– We make rice a ton at our house. Rice is so versatile and a great tip for making things quickly is to make more than you need and store it in the fridge. This way you can whip up a rice mixture for a fast from scratch lunch. For this my Easy Pork Fried Rice works perfectly.

Beans– Beans, lentils, split peas, three bean soups, garbanzo, white and pinto. Are just some of the dried beans that are great to keep on hand. I keep both dried and canned beans in my pantry. We make anything from soups to hummus to refried beans just having these stocked.

Baking Items– Baking powder, baking soda, olive oil nonstick spray, baking cups, vanilla extract, cocoa powder, active yeast.

Spices– Salt, peppercorns/pepper, cumin, garlic salt, chili powder, bay leafs, dried herbs, Italian seasoning.

Cooking Oils- I like to keep an abundance of healthy cooking oils in my pantry. Coconut oil, olive oil, and avocado oil are my go to oils to stock and cook with.

Sweeteners– I keep organic unrefined sugar, brown sugar, raw honey, maple syrup and organic powdered sugar on hand.

Canned Items– artichokes in water, mushrooms in water, tomatoes (diced, crushed, whole, and paste), olives.

Pastas- spaghetti, penne, macaroni, and rotini are just some of the pastas I keep stocked up. I love to make fresh pasta when I have time but when I don’t it is nice to have these on hand.

Cold Pantry Items

Dairy-milk, heavy cream, eggs, cheese, cream cheese and real butter. I make our yogurt out of the milk I buy. It is an easy process and the result is a healthier probiotic rich yogurt that you can use in place of sour cream, as yogurt, for smoothies etc.

Fresh Veggie Staples: Onions, potatoes, celery, carrots, avocados.

Frozen Fruit- blueberries, mixed berries, peaches.

Meat

For meat I buy a bulk order of meats from our local butcher each month. I go for higher quality, meats over store bought and sometimes that means having less meat but better quality. The cuts I keep range from ground beef, steak meat, chicken breast, sausages (polish, smoked, braut), thick cut bacon, whole chickens and roasts.

Cooking from scratch is not as a complicated as the notion might sound when first heard. Additionally eating whole foods is basically the concept of eating actual ingredients and making sure they come from a quality source. Sometimes this isn’t always cost effective when shopping and therefore, at times I find myself having to juggle what is worth the cost and what is not.

A good resource is following the dirty thirty and clean 15. If you have never heard of either of these. It is basically a list of items that range from highest to least found pesticides in a particular produce item. I try to keep this list in the note section of my phone so that I have it handy when shopping. You can grab a free printable of this list below.

You can either download to print or save it to the note section of your phone to have it handy while shopping.

I hope this post gives you a good starting point for stocking your pantry.

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holding groceries to stock a pantry

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