bottled ginger beer
Kitchen Talk,  Recipes

Ginger Beer | How to Make Ginger Beer

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In this quick tuturial you will learn how to make your very own Ginger Beer. It is simple to make and of course a delicious drink. But not only do we drink it for it’s great flavor but it also contains probitoics making it a very healthy drink to have in your kitchen.

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I love traditions especially if they are seasonal and not just something done on a holiday. Applesauce on the stove in the fall, making jam with the strawberry harvest or making ginger beer during the hot months. If you haven’t guessed I am one that does each of these mentioned. But a new one is here to stay, this ginger beer recipe.

For a while I made water kefir and although that is similar in health benefits and even preparing, I find this ginger beer to be the most delicious way to take all the goodness of ferments in. I love how it sits on my countertop, being fed a bit each day for the next batch. I love how on Friday’s this is something you can be sure I am up to in our little kitchen. And grabbing out a fresh one, all cold and ready to be enjoyed for lunch or dinner.

What You’ll Need:

ground organic ginger

sugar

filtered water

Tools You May Need:

a mason jar with a piece of cloth or ferment lid

a funnel

bottles with spring tops

mesh strainer

muslin or cheese cloth

Directions:

Learned from Homewood Stoves and Country Trading Co.

Day 0 is establishing the bug, Days 1 – 6 is feeding it, and Day 7 is bottling and restarting the bug.

Day 0: add 2 cups of water, a few raisins and 2 teaspoons of sugar to a clean glass jar, and stir. Cover, and sit somewhere at room temperature, out of direct sunlight.


Day 1: feed it 2 teaspoons of sugar and 2 teaspoons of ground ginger
Day 2: feed it 2 teaspoons of sugar
Day 3: feed it 2 teaspoons of sugar and 2 teaspoons of ground ginger
Day 4: feed it 2 teaspoons of sugar
Day 5: feed it 2 teaspoons of sugar and 2 teaspoons of ground ginger
Day 6: feed it 2 teaspoons of sugar


Day 7 [one time only, the first time you reach Day 7]: drain off and discard the liquid, discard half the sediment, and add another 2 cups of water, another 2 teaspoons of sugar, stir in the retained sediment and then tomorrow you go back to Day 1.
Day 7 [normal, from every Day 7 except the very first]: dissolve 2 cups of sugar with 2 cups of boiling water in a large clean pot. Once dissolved, add 12 cups of cool water and then stir in the strained juice of 2 lemons. Strain your fermented ginger bug liquid into the mix, capturing and setting aside the sediment. Give the liquid all another good stir.

dissolve 2 cups of sugar with 2 cups of boiling water in a large clean pot
Once dissolved, add 12 cups of cool water and then stir in the strained juice of 2 lemons.
ginger beer starter
Strain your fermented ginger bug liquid into the mix, capturing and setting aside the sediment.

Bottling

Wash your bottles well in hot soapy water, and rinse thoroughly. Bottle, adding a couple of raisins to each bottle if you wish. Fill the bottles a bit short of full, seal, and place somewhere safe at room temperature out of direct sunlight.

Fill the bottles a bit short of full, seal
bottled up ginger beer
place somewhere safe at room temperature out of direct sunlight.

These will be ready to be refrigerated and enjoyed in another week’s time. You do not continue to feed the bottled beer over this final week, but you may wish to monitor the pressure building up, and relieve some of it throughout the week, particularly as you become accustomed to the strength of your individual bug.

ginger beer in a glass
ginger beer in a glass

Still on Day 7, restart your bug: combining half the sediment with another two cups of water and another 2 teaspoons of sugar, cover and tomorrow the cycle begins again at Day 1.

Cheers!

photo of writer

Roxanna

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Wide Mouth Mason Jars

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