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How to Make Lavender Oil

A complete guide on How to Make Lavender Oil in a simple DIY that uses dried lavender stems or whole heads of dried lavender and carrier oil. This wonderfully scented oil can be used for skin, natural remedies, and in the kitchen.

Sharing Our Lavender Harvest

I must say, it was by complete accident that I began growing an abundance of lavender on our property. I purchased several small plants in hopes that just one would make it. After having killed and I say killed in the truest sense here, several others. I didn’t have high hopes. How anyone forgets to water newly planted plants I can’t explain. But it happens, or at least it did to me.

So I went right back down to the store, loaded my cart, and planted with little hope the French lavender I have growing currently. The significance of this lavender is not just the fact that it was a happy accident it would thrive despite my neglectful nature.

But I had no idea the change that it would bring about having chosen this particular plant. It is our largest crop and hands down one of the most beautiful and useful plants I have grown.

This lavender oil is one of my favorite ways to use our lavender and is a great way to up any dried buds from wreaths or bundles you have hanging around. It has a ton of uses and for us, the best use is for my daughter’s Eczema. Applying it soothes her skin instantly and the fact that I have this homegrown, homemade concoction ready to aid her is empowering to say the least.

If you have lots of lavender to use up yourself, try your hand at making a beautiful wreath! Here’s How to Make a Lavender Wreath, a simple guide to making a homemade wreath. Or better yet, bake up some of these wonderful lavender shortbread cookies. We are smitten by them.

What Is Lavender Oil?

It is an oil made through the process of steeping dried lavender buds inside a carrier oil. The natural oils from the lavender are drawn out and into the carrier oil. You then strain off the lavender and are left with a wonderfully infused oil that can be used for skincare, bug bites or culinary uses.

There are several carrier oils that you can use to make lavender oil those include, jojoba oil, sweet almond oil, extra virgin olive oil, or avocado oil. You can read more on these carrier oils below to choose the best option for you.

This lavender oil differs from lavender essential oil which is made through a distillation extraction process rather than infusion. Like we will be doing for this lavender oil.

What You Will Need To Make It

carrier oil (see oil options below)

dried lavender buds

Mason Jar or jar with lid (pint-sized)

Tools

Fine Mesh Strainer

Cheesecloth (optional)

Oils To Use

Multiple oils work well for making lavender oil. Keep in mind if wanting to use lavender oil for the kitchen you will one that is edible. Here are the very best oils to use along with their benefits.

Jojoba Oil– This oil absorbs quickly into the skin and provides long-lasting moisturization. A great option if using lavender oil for skincare use.

Olive Oil– Another great option for skin care, olive oil helps reduce inflammation, deeply hydrates, and is a great option for multi-use lavender oil as olive oil is also edible.

Avocado Oil– Helps relieve inflammation from eczema and psoriasis. It also is a great oil to help treat sunburn and can accelerate wound healing. This oil is an excellent option as it is also edible while providing wonderful benefits to the skin.

Sweet Almond Oil– A good source of vitamin E and is rich in antioxidants. A power moisturizer this oil is edible and an excellent oil for infusing with lavender.

Directions

Cut the lavender and allow it to hang dry in a well-ventilated area for about a week. I use my kitchen for this as the display is lovely while the lavender is drying. To speed up the process please below.

dried lavender buds in a jar

Using a pint-sized jar, fill it up to about 3/4 of the way.

pouring oil into a jar of lavender

Pour the carrier oil over to finish filling up the pint-sized jar. Place lid on.

lavender and a carrier oil in a jar

Put the jar in a sunny location like a window sill and allow it to sit for at least a week but no more than 3 weeks. Every day shake the jar to make sure the lavender isn’t resting on the surface. For this, it’s best to place the jar somewhere you can see it so you don’t forget.

After 1 week (or longer if you decided to let it sit longer), take a fine mesh strainer and place it over a bowl. Pour the oil through to strain off the lavender.

Transfer the oil into a jar for storage. The oil is ready to use.

Notes

  • Make sure to thoroughly dry your lavender before using it. See drying tips below.
  • If you find you have pieces that have fallen into the oil you can opt to use a cheesecloth in addition to the strainer. Simply place the cheesecloth directly into the fine mesh strainer and then pour the oil to strain.
  • The lavender can be infused for up to 3 weeks.
  • Be sure to shake at least once per day to ensure the lavender does not sit too long on the surface of the oil.
  • Make sure to choose the right oil for your intended uses.
  • Store in a cool dry place in a covered container.

Quicker Ways To Dry Lavender

Oven: Set the oven on low about 200℉. Lay the lavender out evenly in a thin row on a baking sheet. Place the baking sheet in the oven for 10 minutes. If the lavender still feels moist rotate the stalks and then leave them in for another 5 minutes.

Food Dehydrator: Food dehydrators work great to speed up the process of drying lavender. Do not wash the lavender, simply snip the heads off and place them in the trays. Don’t overcrowd. If your dehydrator has settings, you will want to set it to herbal; if not, the standard setting is fine.

Leave them in for 2 hours. After this time, check the heads to see how they feel. If they are easy to flake and feel brittle, they are ready. If they still feel moist, leave them in for another hour.

Sun: If you don’t have a dehydrator and don’t feel like switching on the oven, use this basic method. Since the buds will be discarded after steeping, there is no need to protect the color. So it is fine in this case to dry in direct sunlight.

Cut the stems from the lavender, and lay the heads onto a baking sheet evenly. Allow them to sit in direct sunlight for a few hours. Check them periodically, and rotate them if necessary. This should take a few hours of direct sunlight exposure but it is a lot quicker than hang drying for a week or so.

Best Types of Lavender To Use

You can use any type of lavender you would like for this:

  • English
  • French
  • Spanish

Using an English variety is most popular when making lavender oil to use for cooking or baking. Although French and Spanish are still edible they tend to have a bitter taste so they should be used sparingly in cooking or baking.

The most significant thing is the condition of the lavender you are using. It needs to be dried as added moisture can cause it to spoil or mold. It should also be grown organically as you do not want any pesticides steeped into the oil. If you would like more information on how to identify different types of lavender, this 20 Different Types of Lavender post by Gardening Source is super helpful.

Ways To Use Lavender Oil

  • Rub on temples to help soothe a headache
  • Use the lavender oil to make a salve
  • Dab on bug bites
  • Use on sunburns to help calm the stinging
  • Use on eczema to help calm inflammation and flaking
  • If using edible lavender, use it for marinading veggies and meats or pour a touch into baked goods for a delicious floral flavor.
  • Up your bath game and pour some of the oil into your bathwater. It will leave your skin silky smooth.

Benefits of Lavender

  • Can reduce anxiety and stress by calming the nervous system
  • Can help treat skin blemishes
  • Has antibacterial properties
  • Improves Eczema
  • Can help with digestive issues like nausea, and upset stomach
  • Wound healing
  • Insomnia treatment
  • Improve sleep
  • Promotes hair growth
  • Can cure respiratory problems

Shop This Post

Lavender Essential Oil

Dried Lavender

Organic Avocado Oil

Jojoba Oil

Sweet Almond Oil

Organic Olive Oil

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If you try this recipe and love it, I would appreciate you coming back to give it 5 stars!

Yield: 1 pint

Lavender Oil

lavender and a carrier oil in a jar

an oil infused with dried lavender that is good for skin care, bug bites, minor burns or culinary use

Prep Time 10 minutes
Additional Time 7 days
Total Time 7 days 10 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 cups of dried lavender buds
  • 1 1/2 cups carrier oil (almond, olive, avocado)

Instructions

    1. Cut the lavender and allow it to hang dry in a well-ventilated area for about a week. I use my kitchen for this as the display is lovely while the lavender is drying. To speed up the process please below.
    2. Using a pint-sized jar, fill it up to about 3/4 of the way.
    3. Pour the carrier oil over to finish filling up the pint-sized jar. Place lid on.
    4. Put the jar in a sunny location like a window sill and allow it to sit for at least a week but no more than 3 weeks.
    5. Every day shake the jar to make sure the lavender isn't resting on the surface. For this, it's best to place the jar somewhere you can see it so you don't forget.
    6. After the 1 week period (or longer if you decided to let it sit longer), take a fine mesh strainer and place it over a bowl.
    7. Pour the oil through to strain off the lavender. If you find you have pieces that have fallen into the oil you can opt to use a cheesecloth in. addition to the strainer. Simply place the cheesecloth directly into the fine mesh strainer and then pour the oil to strain.
    8. Transfer the oil into a jar for storage. The oil is ready to use.

Notes

  • Make sure to thoroughly dry your lavender before using it. See drying tips.
  • If you find you have pieces that have fallen into the oil you can opt to use a cheesecloth in addition to the strainer. Simply place the cheesecloth directly into the fine mesh strainer and then pour the oil to strain.
  • The lavender can be infused for up to 3 weeks.
  • Be sure to shake at least once per day to ensure the lavender does not sit too long on the surface of the oil.
  • Make sure to choose the right oil for your intended uses.
  • Store in a cool dry place in a covered container.

Nutrition Information:

Yield:

32

Serving Size:

1

Amount Per Serving: Calories: 9Total Fat: 1gSaturated Fat: 0gTrans Fat: 0gUnsaturated Fat: 1gCholesterol: 0mgSodium: 3mgCarbohydrates: 1gFiber: 0gSugar: 0gProtein: 0g

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*Disclaimer: This post may contain affiliate links, which means I may receive commissions if you choose to purchase through the links I provide (at no cost to you).

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